Professor Angela Ndalianis

Angela Ndalianis is Professor in Screen Studies at Melbourne University. Her research interests include: film history and theory; genre studies, with expertise in the horror and science fiction genres; entertainment media and media histories; the contemporary entertainment industry and the convergence of films, video games, television, comic books and theme parks. Her current research explores the important role played by entertainment media in the advancement of robotics. Her publications include Neo-Baroque Aesthetics and Contemporary Entertainment (MIT Press 2004), Science Fiction Experiences (New Academia 2010), The Horror Sensorium; Media and the Senses (McFarland 2012) and The Contemporary Comic Book Superhero (editor, Routledge 2008).

She is currently completing two books: Batman: Myth and Superhero; and Robots and Entertainment Culture, has published numerous essays in refereed journals and anthologies, and is editor of the refereed journal Refractory: a Journal of Entertainment Media. She is a Fellow of the Futures of Entertainment Network (U.S), and was a Trustee of the National Gallery of Victoria between 2004-13. Between 2015-17 she will be the Hans Christian Andersen Academy's Visiting Professor, a position also affiliated with the University of Southern Denmark.

Qualifications

  • PhD (University of Melbourne, 1998)
  • Bachelor of Letters (University of Melbourne)
  • Bachelor of Arts (University of Melbourne)
  • Graduate Diploma in Education (University of Melbourne)
  • Diploma of Humanities (La Trobe University)

Member of

  • Society for Cinema and Media Studies. Primary organisation for cinema and media academics. 2000-
  • Society for Animation Studies. Registered member. 2008-
  • Senses of Cinema. Vice President. 2012-

2013

Research Book Chapters

2012

Authored Research Books
Journal Articles Refereed

2011

Authored Research Books
Journal Articles Refereed
  • Angela Ndalianis 2011, 'Why Comics Studies', CINEJ Cinema Journal, University Library System, University of Pittsburgh, vol. 50, issue 3, pp. 113-117.

2010

Research Book Chapters

2009

Edited Books
Research Book Chapters
Journal Articles Refereed

2008

Research Book Chapters
Journal Articles Refereed
  • Angela Ndalianis 2008, 'From Neo-Baroque to Neo-Baroques?', Revista Canadiense de Estudios Hispanicos, Canadian Association of Hispanic Studies, vol. 33, issue 1, pp. 265-280.
Audio-visual Recordings

2007

Edited Books
Research Book Chapters
  • Angela Ndalianis 2007, 'Foreword', in Wacker ed(s), Baroque Tendencies in Contemporary Art, Cambridge Scholars Publishing, pp. xi-xiv.
  • Angela Ndalianis 2007, 'Do We Need Another Hero?', in Haslem W, Ndalianis A, Mackie C ed(s), Super/Heroes: from Hercules to Superman, New Academia Publishing, pp. 1-10.
Book Chapters Other
  • Angela Ndalianis 2007, 'Art Cinema', in Cook P ed(s), The Cinema Book, BFI Publishing, pp. 83-87.
Journal Articles Unrefereed Letters or Notes

2006

Research Book Chapters
Fully Written Paper Refereed

2005

Research Book Chapters
Book Chapters Other

2004

Authored Research Books
Journal Articles Refereed
  • Angela Ndalianis 2004, 'The Wonder of Digital Effects', Southern Review: Communication, Politics & Culture, RMIT University, vol. 37, issue 1, pp. 21-33.
  • Angela Ndalianis 2004, 'The Wonder of Digital Worlds', Southern Review: Communication, Politics & Culture, RMIT University, vol. 37, issue 1, pp. 21-33.
Journal Articles Unrefereed

2003

Research Book Chapters
Journal Articles Unrefereed
Journal Articles Unrefereed Letters or Notes

2002

Edited Books
Research Book Chapters

2001

Journal Articles Refereed
Journal Articles Unrefereed

Contract information

Other

 

Grant information

2014

2012

2009

2002

Additional grant information

I am currently the recipient of an ARC Discovery Project (with Dr Lisa Beaven) titled "Experiencing Space: Sensory Encounters from Baroque Rome to Neo-baroque Las Vegas". The project is centred on the historical baroque and the neo-baroque and the relationship between them. We examine how both phenomena relied on an intimate relationship between space and the senses operating together, rather than on vision and spectacle alone. The aim is to apply a new methodology to the study of baroque and neo-baroque cultures, one grounded in sensory and spatial approaches. Drawing upon a growing field known as neo-baroque studies, we examine how the metropolis of the late C20th/earlyC21st and the cultural objects that bring it to life – film, urban architecture, digital media – give new expression to the structural and formal qualities of the historical baroque. Our core idea is that the intrinsic formal and expressive qualities of both the historical baroque and the neo-baroque depended on the engagement of all the senses in order to be understood. Our primary case studies will be the cities of Rome and Las Vegas, two cities that represent exemplary examples of the baroque and the neo-baroque. Whereas for theorists such as Jean Baudrillard Las Vegas embodied the postmodern world in excess form, in this project we will instead argue that it is emblematic of the return of a baroque aesthetics that has been nurtured by consumer culture, multi-media conglomeration and digital technology.

I am also part of a collaborative ARC Linkage grant with Flinders University (led by Dr Melanie Swalwell), the Australian Centre for the Moving Image, the Berlin Computerspiele Museum/Berlin Computer Game Museum, and Victoria University of Wellington. The grant is titled "Play It Again: Creating a Playable History of Australasian Digital Games, for Industry, Community and Research Purposes". The project is focused on how digital games make up a significant but little known chapter in the history of the moving image. In the early 1980s, the Australian and New Zealand software industries were remarkably active in this area, yet little is known about the history of this industry, which now contributes millions to exports. Without adequate preservation procedures these entities will be lost to our digital heritage. This project: addresses the need for an institutional collecting and preservation solution; documents and preserves the production and reception histories of these games; and creates playable versions of early games, rendering them accessible to the community now. One of the outcomes of the project is The Popular Memory Archive, an online archive that actively engages the game community to contribute experiences, game information, etc. It's available at: http://playitagainproject.org/

Since 2006, I have been participating in a project with Prof.Juan Luis Suarez (University of Western Ontario) in a study about baroque cultures past and present. The project is titled “The Hispanic Baroque/Transatlantic Baroque: Complexity in the First Atlantic Culture”. The research team of over 20 academics was successful in receiving funding from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada for a Major Research Initiative Grant. The project, which comes to an end later in 2014, has three research times, and mine focuses on the neo-baroque and we examine the transcultural and transhistorical presence of the baroque paradigm.

Supervision

Available for supervision.

Supervision Statement

My areas of research supervision focus on:

  •  Hollywood cinema and entertainment media (video games, theme parks and attractions, comics, television), with particular emphasis on genre theory, especially relating to horror, science fiction and superheroes
  •  the contemporary Hollywood/entertainment industry
  • comic books and superhero culture
  •  film media history/archaeology, especially connections between early film and pre-cinematic viewing technologies and current technologies - with emphasis on perception and the senses
  • neo-baroque studies